October 6, 2022

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Techniques That Can Be Used to Improve Group Performance

3 min read
Group Performance Increase Stylehyme

Taken together, working in groups has both positive and negative outcomes. On the positive side, it makes sense to use groups to make decisions because people can create outcomes working together that any one individual could not hope to accomplish alone. In addition, once a group makes a decision, the group will normally find it easier to get other people to implement it, because many people feel that decisions made by groups are fairer than are those made by individuals.

Yet groups frequently succumb to process losses, leading them to be less effective than they should be. Furthermore, group members often don’t realize that the process losses are occurring around them. For instance, people who participate in brainstorming groups report that they have been more productive than those who work alone, even if the group has actually not done that well.

The tendency for group members to overvalue the productivity of the groups they work in is known as the illusion of group productivity, and it seems to occur for several reasons. For one, the productivity of the group as a whole is highly accessible, and this productivity generally seems quite good, at least in comparison to the contributions of single individuals. The group members hear many ideas expressed by themselves and the other group members, and this gives the impression that the group is doing very well, even if objectively it is not. And, on the affective side, group members receive a lot of positive social identity from their group memberships. These positive feelings naturally lead them to believe that the group is strong and performing well.

What we need to do, then, is to recognize both the strengths and limitations of group performance and use whatever techniques we can to increase process gains and reduce process losses.

Following is the list of all techniques that can be used for increasing the performance of any group:

  1. Provide rewards for performance
  2. Keep group member contributions identifiable
  3. Maintain distributive justice (equity)
  4. Keep groups small
  5. Create positive group norms
  6. Improve information sharing
  7. Allow plenty of time
  8. Set specific and attainable goals

Let’s start

1. Provide rewards for performance.

Rewarding employees and team members with bonuses will increase their effort toward the group goal. People will also work harder in groups when they feel that they are contributing to the group goal than when they feel that their contributions are not important.

The tendency to overvalue the productivity of group in comparison to individual performance.

2. Keep group member contributions identifiable.

Group members will work harder if they feel that their contributions to the group are known and potentially seen positively by the other group members than they will if their contributions are summed into the group total and thus unknown.

3. Maintain distributive justice (equity).

Workers who feel that their rewards are proportional to their efforts in the group will be happier and work harder than will workers who feel that they are underpaid.

4. Keep groups small.

Larger groups are more likely to suffer from coordination problems and social loafing. The most effective working groups are of relatively small size—about four or five members.

5. Create positive group norms.

Group performance is increased when the group members care about the ability of the group to do a good job (e.g., a cohesive sports or military team). On the other hand, some groups develop norms that prohibit members from working to their full potential and thus encourage loafing.

6. Improve information sharing.

Leaders must work to be sure that each member of the group is encouraged to present the information that he or she has in group discussions. One approach to increasing full discussion of the issues is to have the group break up into smaller subgroups for discussion.

7. Allow plenty of time.

Groups take longer to reach consensus, and allowing plenty of time will help keep the group from coming to premature consensus and making an unwise choice. Time to consider the issues fully also allows the group to gain new knowledge by seeking information and analysis from outside experts.

8. Set specific and attainable goals.

Groups that set specific, difficult, yet attainable goals (e.g., “improve sales by 20% over the next 4 months”) are more effective than groups that are given goals that are not very clear (e.g., “let’s sell as much as we can!”).


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